Fund Your Utopia Without Me.™

25 May 2013

Woolwich Slaughter Backlash: 'Evidently, We Must Tolerate The Intolerant Infidel, Who Couldn't Take A Decapi!'






By James Delingpole


OK so which would you say is the worse crime?

a) killing an unarmed man with meat cleavers in a London street and then trying to slice his head off?

b) describing the alleged killers as “of Muslim appearance” on BBC news?

Call me old-fashioned but I would have gone for a). Which just goes to show how badly out of tune with the times I am because the correct answer is in fact b). I know so because I checked on Twitter.

Sure there were one or two reactionary old farts like me coming up with the usual hysterical guff about how barbaric and awful and shocking it was. But the clever Tweeters knew straight away what the real problem was.

It was that bloody Nick Robinson, that’s who was really to blame for all this. He’d actually gone on to BBC news and used the phrase – “of Muslim appearance.” Which as any half-way educated person could tell you is about as inflammatory and wrong as you can get.

For a start, how can anyone be “of Muslim appearance”? It’s a religion, damn it, not a race, which embraces everyone from dark-skinned Africans in Nigeria to oriental-looking islanders in Indonesia to pallid Caucasian types in Chechnya. (I’m not sure whether any of these sophisticated Tweeters went into such detail but they could have done, I’ll bet. Probably they’ve got a really good degree in Cultural Relativism studies at SOAS – or similar – because they’re not ignorant these kids. Fuck no! They went to Bali and Kathmandu in their gap year)

And for another thing, what an outrageous assumption to make when the facts of the case were still unknown! I mean, OK, sure, there’d been eyewitness reports of the men yelling “Allahu Akbar” as they went about their business; and, all right, there was video footage of one of the men telling passers-by “We swear by the mighty Allah we will never stop fighting until you leave us alone.”

Even so, that’s still no reason for Robinson to have jumped to the conclusion that this crime had anything whatsoever to do with the men’s religion. Or perceived religion. What if they were in fact Christians or Buddhists or atheists trying to give the religion of peace a bad name? Or, supposing for a moment they were Muslims, how do we know had their faith had anything to do with the killing? And even if it did, why draw attention to it? Like, when a Christian murders somebody, does his religion get mentioned? What about Peter Sutcliffe, the Yorkshire Ripper: he said he heard the voice of God in his head telling him to do it – but no one ever mentions his crime as a Christian crime, do they?

On occasions like this I really do feel a bit of an intellectual lightweight, I must say. There am I, stuck in the fuddy-duddy mindset where you see a 25-year old father of a one year old boy being hacked to death with meat cleavers on a busy London street and all you can do is respond with the gut feeling that “This is wrong. This is totally wrong!”

Whereas if I were a bit younger, less reactionary and I’d had a proper educational grounding somewhere serious like the LSE, what I would have realised is that you just can’t judge things like this at face value. Sure, there’s a temptation to dwell on what a terrible way to go it must have been for that poor young man; to think about what his family must be going through – his wife and mother especially, who will surely be re-living his imagined death every day from now on till they die; to get quite angry, even, about the perverted political values and warped mindset that led to this barbaric act – and also about the cultural relativism that helped make it possible. But succumbing to this temptation would, of course, be a serious mistake.






No, if you’re a truly enlightened citizen of the modern world, the correct way to respond is the way all those sophisticated intellectual types on Twitter did. You recognise straightaway that the horror of the murder is just a distraction from the real issue. The real issue being, of course, that this regrettable event was the sadly inevitable consequence of Britain’s racism, intolerance and Islamophobia – as demonstrated by Nick Robinson’s bigoted, ignorant and inflammatory use of that reprehensible “of Muslim appearance” comment on BBC news for which he has since, quite correctly, apologised.

Until, as a society, we learn to face up to our collective responsibility for Drummer Lee Rigby’s death, young men like Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale ought to have every right to go on drawing attention to this rampant injustice in whatever way they deem fit. It is frankly outrageous that in order to make their point they had to resort to the blunt instrument of execution by motor vehicle and butcher’s knife. A truly considerate society would have made public funds available for them to afford some properly functioning automatic weaponry. That way these gallant, oppressed freedom fighters could have made their vibrant and refreshingly direct contribution to our national debate with a lot less fuss and a lot less mess – perhaps preventing the disgraceful public overreaction we have witnessed over the last couple of days, everywhere from the hateful, violent racist English Defence League to the hardcore, fascist right-wing BBC.




video

 

Now, here, is what the media really misses here.  While the media is so anxious to lump all religions into one and say, 'Muslims are no different than Christians.'  Well, if you want to talk that way, let's say it this way: Crazy Christians are no difference from Crazy Muslims.  How's that?  

Anyone, who wants to kill, but there is a difference between a Crazy Christian than a Non-Crazy Christian and there's a difference between a Crazy Muslim and a Non-Crazy Crazy Muslim.  And there appears to be more Crazy Muslims than Crazy Christians.  What do you say that we together against the Crazy Christian, Crazy Muslims, Crazy Jews, Crazy Buddhists?  CRAZY is the operative word here.

They THINK that it might be an act of terror.  What was it?  Was it a trip to the soda shoppe?  What it a possible tailour accident.  He had his shears out.  He was just gonna trim some thread around the guy's next .  Is that what it was?  Is there another possibility?  Or, maybe, there was a YouTube video.

This was clearly a terrorist attack by cold-hearted, Crazy Muslims.  Period. 

Now, if you agree with me that the Greatest Generation would never have done that.  That's the difference.  What's the difference between the Greatest Generation and our generation? 

1.  There didn't have wussified leaders all of over the world.  They didn't have girls for leaders.  And, no offence to women, I mean, girls.  I swear to you the leaders we have on this planet make a brownie troop look like Seals.

Why don't you get your little girl underpants off and put some man pants on and tell the American People and the world the truth? 

The truth is terror exists.  Terror is a tactic.  And, who is using that tactic?  Well, I tell you...a few people.  The main group that is using this tactic is crazy-assed Muslims...and that's what needs to be said.

'Now, we going to look into this..."

What do you need to look into?   The guy had a butcher knife, blood on his hands, and was screaming 'Allahu Akbar!"  What more do you need, Sherlock?


2. There was one individual who stood up.  ONE.  It was a woman, which is why I said no offence to women earlier.  It was a WOMAN THAT STOOP UP!   In fact, she didn't just stand up.  She first had to stand up on the bus, pull the little string so that the bell would ring to stop the bus on which she was riding so she got off the buss because she saw blood in the streets.  She looked around at all of the sheep directly being led to slaughter and walked up to the guy with the blood on his hands and asked 'What the Hell is going on?"

She thought it was an accident and then she realised that he just killed him.

'So,' she said, 'what isn't that you want?'

This woman approached him, confronted him.  She then looked back at the crowd with contempt and disgust.

Do you know what made her stand up in the bus?

Her Christian belief. 


She's a Catholic.

Her Christian belief.  


When she found out that it wasn't an accident, why did she pursue him?  Because she said that there were children there and it would be better for something to happen to her than to a child.

Where were the rest of the sheep?

Here's the difference between us and the Greatest Generation:  The Greatest Generation had leaders and in the Greatest Generation we had God.  

There were things that were bigger than us.  There were things worth living for.  Things worth dying for.  

What are those things left dying for?  What are those things worth standing for anymore?  Your job, your car, your house?  How many of us will sit down to 'save' our children? 

I don't want my children to live in a world like that. 

It is no life to doom our children to a life run by the Muslim Brotherhood.
  

It is NO Life!


You are leaving a life to be run by crazy-assed Muslims, if you don't wake up and start telling the truth.  We are being co-opted.  We are being taught. 

Do you really think that anyone would have allowed this to happen in the Greatest Generation?  The men would have looked at one another and said 'Get him!'  You don't do it on your own, but they weren't alone.

Why do you think these people are so bold?  

You have been taught to be silent. 

What are the difference between the 4 aeroplanes that crashed on 9/11?  The first three thought that it was a hi-jacking and they thought that they would live.  They didn't think that anyone was crazy enough to fly them into a building.  

The fourth plane, because they had information, they knew and Todd Beamer stood up and said"


'It's better to go down fighting, then go down like sheep.  We're gonna save people.' And so, they rushed and they lost.  But, we remember their names.  I will never forget, I will never forget "Todd Beamer's name.'   I will never forget 'Let's Roll!'  And, I am ashamed to say that I will never forget the Sheep in the streets of London.




Choose YOU today.

THAT IS YOUR CHOICE.


Who do YOU serve?

THAT IS YOUR CHOICE.


Choose today: Life or Death?

THAT IS YOUR CHOICE.


Choose today:  What is the future you want your children to live under?

THAT IS YOUR CHOICE.


Freedom:  Freedom where, yes, there are times where we can be divisive, or death?

THAT IS YOUR CHOICE.


Submit or die.

THAT IS YOUR CHOICE.


As for me and my family,  I chose God.

THAT IS YOUR CHOICE.


What choice will you make?
 
WHAT IS YOUR CHOICE?



This Beck snippet is part of a bigger piece that I am doing.  Watch for it.  I think that you'll like it.



Related:  
  









http://tinyurl.com/q7w2kjm

'Toon of the Day: Bo, Fetch! I Need The News Of My Administration!






Michael Ramirez Cartoon



http://tinyurl.com/otfjs67


Pic of the Day: Forget Another Bus...Cankles Are Dangerous To Axels




http://1389blog.com/pix/Obama-biting-Hillarys-buttocks.png

Germany's 'Rose Monday' Carnival

 

And, I know how much my male readers luv dem sum 'Free Pussy' in the morning...

 

 Gerard Depardieu as Obelix pleads with Putin on behalf of Pussy Riot

 'Pussy Riot' attacking both Vladimir Putin and the Orthodox Christian Church

 

Alas for my guys, they're lezbos...

 

http://tinyurl.com/q9anr8p



24 May 2013

Led To The Multi-Kulti Slaughter






British lions come up lambs in 
Woolwich.


By Mark Steyn

On Wednesday, Drummer Lee Rigby of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, a man who had served Queen and country honorably in the hell of Helmand Province in Afghanistan, emerged from his barracks on Wellington Street, named after the Duke thereof, in southeast London. Minutes later, he was hacked to death in broad daylight and in full view of onlookers by two men with machetes who crowed “Allahu akbar!” as they dumped his carcass in the middle of the street like so much road kill.

As grotesque as this act of savagery was, the aftermath was even more unsettling. The perpetrators did not, as the Tsarnaev brothers did in Boston, attempt to escape. Instead, they held court in the street gloating over their trophy, and flagged down a London bus to demand the passengers record their triumph on film. As the crowd of bystanders swelled, the remarkably urbane savages posed for photographs with the remains of their victim while discoursing on the iniquities of Britain toward the Muslim world. Having killed Drummer Rigby, they were killing time: It took 20 minutes for the somnolent British constabulary to show up. And so television viewers were treated to the spectacle of a young man, speaking in the vowels of south London, chatting calmly with his “fellow Britons” about his geopolitical grievances and apologizing to the ladies present for any discomfort his beheading of Drummer Rigby might have caused them, all while drenched in blood and still wielding his cleaver.

 If you’re thinking of getting steamed over all that, don’t. Simon Jenkins, the former editor of the Times of London, cautioned against “mass hysteria” over “mundane acts of violence.”

That’s easy for him to say. Woolwich is an unfashionable part of town, and Sir Simon is unlikely to find himself there of an afternoon stroll. Drummer Rigby had less choice in the matter. Being jumped by barbarians with machetes is certainly “mundane” in Somalia and Sudan, but it’s the sort of thing that would once have been considered somewhat unusual on a sunny afternoon in south London — at least as unusual as, say, blowing up eight-year-old boys at the Boston Marathon. It was “mundane” only in the sense that, as at weddings and kindergarten concerts, the reflexive reaction of everybody present was to get out their cell phones and start filming.


banner



Once, long ago, I was in an altercation where someone pulled a switchblade, and ever since have been mindful of Jimmy Hoffa’s observation that he’d rather jump a gun than a knife. Nevertheless, there is a disturbing passivity to this scene: a street full of able-bodied citizens being lectured to by blood-soaked murderers who have no fear that anyone will be minded to interrupt their diatribes. In fairness to the people of Boston, they were ordered to “shelter in place” by the governor of Massachusetts. In Woolwich, a large crowd of Londoners apparently volunteered to “shelter in place,” instinctively. Consider how that will play when these guys’ jihadist snuff video is being hawked around the bazaars of the Muslim world. Behold the infidels, content to be bystanders in their own fate.

This passivity set the tone for what followed. In London as in Boston, the politico-media class immediately lapsed into the pneumatic multiculti Tourette’s that seems to be a chronic side effect of excess diversity-celebrating: No Islam to see here, nothing to do with Islam, all these body parts in the street are a deplorable misinterpretation of Islam. The BBC’s Nick Robinson accidentally described the men as being “of Muslim appearance,” but quickly walked it back lest impressionable types get the idea that there’s anything “of Muslim appearance” about a guy waving a machete and saying “Allahu akbar.” A man is on TV dripping blood in front of a dead British soldier and swearing “by Almighty Allah we will never stop fighting you,” yet it’s the BBC reporter who’s apologizing for “causing offence.” To David Cameron, Drummer Rigby’s horrific end was “not just an attack on Britain and on the British way of life, it was also a betrayal of Islam. . . . There is nothing in Islam that justifies this truly dreadful act.”

How does he know? He doesn’t seem the most likely Koranic scholar. Appearing on David Letterman’s show a while back, Cameron was unable to translate into English the words “Magna Carta,” which has quite a bit to do with that “British way of life” he’s so keen on. But apparently it’s because he’s been up to his neck in suras and hadiths every night sweating for Sharia 101. So has Scotland Yard’s deputy assistant commissioner, Brian Paddick, who reassured us after the London Tube bombings that “Islam and terrorism don’t go together,” and the mayor of Toronto, David Miller, telling NPR listeners after 19 Muslims were arrested for plotting to behead the Canadian prime minister: “You know, in Islam, if you kill one person you kill everybody,” he said in a somewhat loose paraphrase of Koran 5:32 that manages to leave out some important loopholes. “It’s a very peaceful religion.” 

That’s why it fits so harmoniously into famously peaceful societies like, say, Sweden. For the last week Stockholm has been ablaze every night with hundreds of burning cars set alight by “youths.” Any particular kind of “youth”? The Swedish prime minister declined to identify them any more precisely than as “hooligans.” But don’t worry: The “hooligans” and “youths” and men of no Muslim appearance whatsoever can never win because, as David Cameron ringingly declared, “they can never beat the values we hold dear, the belief in freedom, in democracy, in free speech, in our British values, Western values.” Actually, they’ve already gone quite a way toward eroding free speech, as both prime ministers demonstrate. The short version of what happened in Woolwich is that two Muslims butchered a British soldier in the name of Islam and helpfully explained, “The only reason we have done this is because Muslims are dying every day.” But what do they know? They’re only Muslims, not Diversity Outreach Coordinators. So the BBC, in its so-called “Key Points,” declined to mention the “Allahu akbar” bit or the “I”-word at all: Allah who?

Not a lot of Muslims want to go to the trouble of chopping your head off, but when so many Western leaders have so little rattling around up there, they don’t have to. And, as we know from the sob-sister Tsarnaev profiles, most of these excitable lads are perfectly affable, or at least no more than mildly alienated, until the day they set a hundred cars alight, or blow up a school boy, or decapitate some guy. And, if you’re lucky, it’s not you they behead, or your kid they kill, or even your Honda Civic they light up. And so life goes on, and it’s all so “mundane,” in Simon Jenkins’s word, that you barely notice when the Jewish school shuts up, and the gay bar, and the uncovered women no longer take a stroll too late in the day, and the publishing house that gets sent the manuscript for the next Satanic Verses decides it’s not worth the trouble. . . . But don’t worry, they’ll never defeat our “free speech” and our “way of life.”

One in ten Britons under 25 is now Muslim. That number will increase, through immigration, disparate birth rates, and conversions like those of the Woolwich killers, British-born and -bred. Metternich liked to say the Balkans began in the Landstrasse, in southeast Vienna. Today, the Dar al-Islam begins in Wellington Street, in southeast London. That’s a “betrayal” all right, but not of Islam.


Fuck you, Peter Mandelson, Neil Kinnock, Tony Blair, New Labour, David Miliaband, Red Ed, Ed Bawwwwwwls, Gordon Brown, Ron Todd, Andrew Neather, Labour's 'Progress' think-tank, Arthur Scargill, and the rest of you traitors that pushed this treasonous plot on a loving land.



Related:  





http://tinyurl.com/qbkfks8

Looking For Some New Dee-lish Digs? a/k/a House Porn For Dreamers


Some of the scenes in the 1969 Oscar-winning Women in Love were filmed in  OliverReed?s home, Broome Hall in Dorking. It has now been divided and  comprises several apartments. The main portion of the mansion has nine  bedrooms, three bathrooms, two receptions and library/study. £1.65m, Savills.

BROOME HALL, DORKING

Some of the scenes in the 1969 Oscar-winning Women in Love were filmed in Oliver Reed’s home, Broome Hall in Dorking. It has now been divided and comprises several apartments. The main portion of the mansion has nine bedrooms, three bathrooms, two receptions and library/study. £1.65m.


The actress Hayley Mills and Gordon Selfridge Jr, son of H Gordon  Selfridge, who founded Selfridges, each once lived in Friars Lawn. A  Grade II-listed Georgian house, it has impressive views over the  conservation area of Norwood Green, west London. £1.9m, lFelicity J Lord.


FRIARS LAWN, NORWOOD GREEN


The actress Hayley Mills and Gordon Selfridge Jr, son of H Gordon Selfridge, who founded Selfridges, each once lived in Friars Lawn. A Grade II-listed Georgian house, it has impressive views over the conservation area of Norwood Green, west London. £1.9m.



Agatha Christie wrote many of her bestselling murder-mysteries at her  mews home in Chelsea. The buildings was originally a stables, but after  she bought it in the late 1920s, she converted it to suit her and stayed  there for life. It has parquet floors, four bedrooms and a blue plaque.  £2.6m, John D Wood.


MEWS HOUSE, CHELSEA

Agatha Christie wrote many of her bestselling murder-mysteries at her mews home in Chelsea. The buildings was originally a stables, but after she bought it in the late 1920s, she converted it to suit her and stayed there for life. It has parquet floors, four bedrooms and a blue plaque. £2.6m.


Roger Moore lived at Sherwood House, Uxbridge, in the 1970s, when he  starred  as James Bond in Live and Let Die, The Man with the Golden Gun and The Spy Who Loved Me. The property, on 11 acres, has five bedrooms,  gym, wine cellar, pool, annexe and guesthouse. £4.5m, Savills.


 SHERWOOD HOUSE, UXBRIDGE

Roger Moore lived at Sherwood House, Uxbridge, in the 1970s, when he starred  as James Bond in Live and Let Die, The Man with the Golden Gun and The Spy Who Loved Me. The property, on 11 acres, has five bedrooms, gym, wine cellar, pool, annexe and guesthouse. £4.5m


Beautiful courtyard garden in house in Mitford, Northumberland


MITFORD, NORTHUMBERLAND

The ruined walls of what was once a grand manor frame this beautiful courtyard garden, which belongs to a Grade II listed property in the popular village of Mitford. £700,000, Strutt & Parker


 And if you're looking to rent, how about Hoe Farmhouse in Hascombe, Surrey? It was let to Sir Winston Churchill in  1915, and he finished four known paintings of the property there. Dating  from the 16th century, it is set in Gertrude Jekyll-landscaped gardens.  The farmhouse was modified by Sir Edwin Lutyens. There are paddocks with  stable block. To let: £10,500 per month, Smiths Gore.


HOE FARMHOUSE IN HASCOMBE

And if you're looking to rent, how about Hoe Farmhouse in Hascombe, Surrey? It was let to Sir Winston Churchill in 1915, and he finished four known paintings of the property there. Dating from the 16th century, it is set in Gertrude Jekyll-landscaped gardens. The farmhouse was modified by Sir Edwin Lutyens. There are paddocks with stable block. To let: £10,500 per month


Grade II listed Dove Farm sit with three adjacent cottages around a picturesque brick paved courtyard

DOVE FARM, WARWICKSHIRE


Grade II listed Dove Farm sits with three adjacent cottages around a picturesque brick paved courtyard, entered via a medieval-style archway .£1.65 million, including the cottages, Knight Frank.


The radio and television host Johnny Vaughan?s period home in  Wandsworth, south London, also has other broadcasting links: it once  belonged to Louis Theroux. The 1850-built property has a large  kitchen/breakfast room and is decorated in French-style neutrals. £3.5m, Savills.


 WANDSWORTH

The radio and television host Johnny Vaughan’s period home in Wandsworth, south London, also has other broadcasting links: it once belonged to Louis Theroux. The 1850-built property has a large kitchen/breakfast room and is decorated in French-style neutrals. £3.5m


The Coach House in Bristol?s upmarket Clifton area helped make musical  history.  The album Dummy by Portishead and many tracks on Blue Lines by  Massive Attack were recorded there in the Eighties and Nineties.  Studios are still wired for sound. The cottage is ready for conversion  to a family home. £385,000, C J Hole.


THE COACH HOUSE IN CLIFTON

...in Bristol’s upmarket Clifton area helped make musical history.  The album Dummy by Portishead and many tracks on Blue Lines by Massive Attack were recorded there in the Eighties and Nineties. Studios are still wired for sound. The cottage is ready for conversion to a family home. £385,000


The film Saturday Night Fever is said to have been conceived in the  summerhouse of this Hertfordshire home. Music journalist Nik Cohn wrote a  piece there that inspired it, and the Bee Gees were frequent visitors.  The house, in Ardeley village, has a chapel-like studio in the garden.  £750,000, Mullucks Wells.



 ARDELEY IN HERTFORDSHIRE
 
The film Saturday Night Fever is said to have been conceived in the summerhouse of this Hertfordshire home. Music journalist Nik Cohn wrote a piece there that inspired it, and the Bee Gees were frequent visitors. The house, in Ardeley village, has a chapel-like studio in the garden. £750,000


Classic Georgian-fronted building in Suffolk

LONG MELFORD, SUFFOLK

With a name like Coconut House, you might expect this property to be a little more exotic. In fact, it's a Georgian-fronted building with a homely courtyard garden. A spiral staircase leads up from the courtyard to a small terrace above. £725,000, David Burr.


Somewhat grander than a den, Duncan Bannatyne?s five-bedroom home in  Durham comes with designer fittings. The kitchen/breakfast room has  floor-to ceiling windows on two sides. £875,000, Manners and Harrison.


DUNCAON BANABTYNE'S DURHAM

Somewhat grander than a den, Duncan Bannatyne’s five-bedroom home in Durham comes with designer fittings. The kitchen/breakfast room has floor-to ceiling windows on two sides. £875,000


Positioned on the Elizabethan walls of Berwick-upon-Tweed is a historic house with a quaint Italian-style courtyard


BERWICK-UPON-TWEED, NORTHUMBERLAND


Positioned on the Elizabethan walls of Berwick-upon-Tweed is a historic house with a quaint Italian-style courtyard. £360,000, Smiths Gore


This airy home is converted from a former stable block


KINGSTON UPON THAMES, LONDON


This homely property is converted from a former stable block, and has a tranquil circular courtyard at its centre. The house has five bedrooms and three self-contained one-bedroom suites around the courtyard, perfect for any visiting friends or family. Around £6 million






FORMER PRIME MINISTER'S HOME


Guide price: from £11.5 million
Agent: Knight Frank (020 7499 1012) or Fine & Country (020 7079 1523)

Love your history? This Grade-II listed building in the heart of Mayfair, now converted into five apartments, was once home to Robert Walpole, Britain's first prime minister. Buy one, and soak up the atmosphere

 A stunning ground floor courtyard with decking and a glass window




KNIGHTSBRIDGE, LONDON 

 
A stunning ground floor courtyard with decking and a glass window, allowing you to peer into the basement rooms below. The house is a three-bedroom mews home, with underfloor heating and private parking. £10.75 million,



 Courtyard of period home in Calne


CALNE, WILTSHIRE


Identified by English Heritage as the best surviving 17th century building in the town of Calne, this period home has a gravel courtyard with raised beds and pergolas. £425,000, Hamptons International.

 


 DIANE REDMOND'S CAMBRIDGE COTTAGE


Guide price: £599,995
Agent: Fine & Country Cambridge (01223 363700)
A quaint cottage in the village of Great Sheltford that was once owned by Diane Redmond, the children's author and dramatist. Her Pony Club series was very popular in the 1990s.




RINGO STARR'S LONDON BASE



Guide price: from £3.7 million
Agent: Kaye & Carey (02075 900066)
In the early 1990s, Ringo Starr lived with his Bond Girl wife Barbara Bach in a mews house in Kensington and Chelsea. The entire cul de sac has now been completely redeveloped, with four properties on the market.






DAVID BRADLEY'S SOUTH-WEST ESCAPE


Guide price: £695,00
Agent: Fine & Country, Bath ( 01225 320031)
David Bradley, the actor who starred in Kes, supposedly bought this Grade II-listed church conversion because there were so many kestrels flying around. The property, in Radstock, near Bath, is mentioned in the Domesday Book, and is filled with beautiful vaulted ceilings, stone archways, stained glass and frescoes.



 CHILDHOOD HOME OF THE SUPER FURRY ANIMALS


Guide price: £725,000
Guide price: Jackson-Stops & Staff, Chester office (01244 328361)
Music fans will be delighted to hear that this picturesque farmhouse near Pentraeth in Wales is for sale. According to the estate agent, the home was once owned by diplomat Dr Carl Clowes, whose sons, Cian Ciaran and Dafydd Ieuan, founded the Super Furry Animals in the 1990s.


Barn conversion in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Oxfordshire


CROWSLEY, OXFORDSHIRE 

 
A swimming pool is the centrepiece of the courtyard at this barn conversion in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The courtyard enjoys sun for most of the day and is surrounded by buildings on all four sides, meaning you can enjoy a dip in complete privacy. £3.5 million, Knight Frank.



 Courtyard at a restored palazzo in Florence

FLORENCE, ITALY
 
The famed Renaissance architect Filippo Brunelleschi designed the courtyard at this restored palazzo in Florence. An apartment in the building is for sale for £1.14 million, Knight Frank.





SANTO VERSACE'S MILAN PAD
   

Guide price: £41.6 million
Agent: Milan Sotheby’s International Realty (+39 02 8707 8300)
Where else would a fashion chief like Santo Versace live but in the heart of MIlan's fashion district? This four-storey home was built in the 1950s, and offers - as you might imagine - a deeply stylish interior, with beautiful mosaics.



A well sits in the centre of this colonnaded courtyard with cobbled paving, part of a monastery that dates back nearly 800 year


LAZIO, ITALY


A well sits in the centre of this colonnaded courtyard with cobbled paving, part of a monastery that dates back nearly 800 years. The building has now been turned into a nine-bedroom home, which could easily be run as a boutique hotel. £1.89 million, Cluttons Italy.


15th century palace being converted into 18 apartments


VENICE, ITALY

Right in the heart of Venice is a 15th century palace being converted into 18 apartments. Residents will have access to a peaceful central courtyard that features a water fountain. From £630,000, Venice Sotheby’s International Realty.



Tranquil courtyard, filled with potted plants, in Spain


El Madroñal, Spain

This tranquil courtyard, filled with potted plants, really comes into its own at night. The villa is in a gated community not far from Puerto Banús, with a swimming pool, gym and cinema room. £4.72 million, DM Properties.


This beachside home with sea views is built around a central courtyard


MARBELLA, SPAIN

 
This beachside home with sea views is built around a central courtyard, perfect for al fresco dining and entertaining. Fine & Country, £2.32 million.

 
 


FASHION DESIGNER'S ITALIAN CASTLE


Guide price: £3.1 million
Agent: Agenzia Immobiliare Francesco Papurello (020 7467 5330)
Sometimes described as "the architect of fashion", Gianfranco Ferré was a celebrated Italian fashion designer who became the stylistic director of Christian Dior. This fairytale castle facing Lake Maggiore was once his home. It has two private beaches and a spare property in the grounds. Plus, we're betting, lots of wardrobe space.



On The Other Side Of The Pond




 Blaine Trump, Donald?s former sister-in-law, is selling her New York  state home ? a near-200-acre farm with a Greek Revival mansion. The  20-room home has seven bedrooms and 10 bathrooms, while the grounds  include two ponds, pool, tennis court and carriage house. $17.5m  [£11.5m), Houlihanlawrence.

Blaine Trump, Donald’s former sister-in-law, is selling her New York state home — a near-200-acre farm with a Greek Revival mansion. The 20-room home has seven bedrooms and 10 bathrooms, while the grounds include two ponds, pool, tennis court and carriage house. $17.5m [£11.5m)





JENNIFER LOPEZ'S MIAMI HOME


Guide price: £25.4 million
Agent: Nelson Gonzalez (020 7467 5330)
You'll need deep pockets to nab yourself J-Lo's former home, a 1920s estate on Miami Beach. The property has 200 feet of bay frontage, fantastic views over Miami's skyline, a 800-bottle wine cellar and a pool. Plus, unsurprisingly, security doors for the master suite. 





MARY TYLER MOORE'S NEW YORK ESTATE

 
Guide price: £9.5 million
Agent: Houlihan Lawrence (020 7467 5330)
This charming English-style property is the former home of Mary Tyler Moore, the American sitcom actress. Ideal for horse lovers, it has plenty of stables, an outdoor and indoor ring, and land for the horses to roam in. There's also a pool and - just in case you needed it - a carriage house. You'll have no excuse for not turning up to parties in style.


 1970s home in Houston, Texas

HOUSTON, TEXAS 


The perfect spot to enjoy a cool beer on those hot Texas nights, this atmospheric courtyard belongs to a 1970s home with 4-6 bedrooms. £2.28 million, Daugherty Realtors


Courtyard of seven-bedroom home, on the Royal Westmoreland resort in Barbados


BARBADOS


Koi carp swim in a pond shaded by banana trees in the courtyard of this seven-bedroom home, on the Royal Westmoreland resort in Barbados. Facilities include a golf course, gym, spa and beach club. Price on application, from Royal Westmoreland.






LOOKING FOR GALT'S GULCH?





DUMUNPALIT ISLAND, PHILIPPINES

 
You can imagine a Bond villain having a lair in this striking island, which has 150-foot high volcanic towers crowning both ends. Locals call it "Turtle island", because the protrusions look a little like turtle fins. The island is surrounded by coral reefs and has over 2,000 feet of beautiful white sand beaches to soak up the sun on. Accommodation however is a little limited - at the moment there's just a caretaker's cottage, and a guest cottage overlooking a private lagoon. Around £2.2m.




DOUBLE ISLAND, ONTARIO, CANADA


 

It's easy to see how this unusually shaped island gained its name. Its six acres are covered with pines and cedars, while there are two natural harbours to sail into - one on the island's east side, and one on the west. A 2,500-square foot house with water views has already been built, and there's also a 1920s cottage which could be renovated. Best of all, it's only a two-hour drive from Toronto. Around £2m





LITTLE BOKEELIA ISLAND, FLORIDA, US

 
Thomas Edison is said to have visited this island when it was owned by the pioneering American chemist Charles Burgess - supposedly, a tree which Edison planted is still there today. The 1920s Spanish-style house was built by Burgess, but has been significantly expanded by its current owners. The island is surrounded by protected state and privately owned land, so its privacy and views should never be threatened. Around £19.1m





EILEAN RIGH, INNER HEBRIDES, SCOTLAND



 

Eilean Righ, ‘The King’s Island’, has a number of unusual royal connections. Its name may pay tribute to the Danish sea King Olaf, who possibly died in the region, while in the1930s, it was owned by the tutor to the last emperor of China Pu Yi, Sir Reginald Fleming Johnston (who was famously played by Sir Peter O'Toole in the film The Last Emperor). Today, there are two houses and a number of outbuildings - including a helicopter hangar and observatory - plus the remains of two iron age forts. £3m


 


GUNPOWDER ISLAND, BERMUDA

This lovely Caribbean island owes its slightly alarming name to the fact it was used as a secret storehouse for military explosives in the 19th century. Today, it's a rather more tranqil place, offering a vast array of accommodation (including a former military barracks). Beautiful features such as a Japanese garden, orchard and waterfall litter the island, and it has has full electricity and water services. Price on request


 


 NANANU-I-CAKE ISLAND, FIJI

The scent of mango and pine trees fills the air at Nananu-i-Cake, a 600-acre island which was once owned by Sir Harold Mitchell, the Tory politician who was vice-chairman of the Conservative party under Sir Winston Churchill. The island offers five beaches, a luxury residence with swimming poool and a deep-water jetty. Around £6.5m



 


MOTO OPUOU, FRENCH POLYNESIA

A tiny island, covering just one acre, located in the lagoon of Raiatea - the largest lagoon of French Polynesia in the Windward Islands. There's a vast amount of white sand beaches and crystal-clear waters, while the island's position between two larger islands mean it is very sheltered. Around £508,000




MOUNU ISLAND, TONGA

Fancy a home where you can watch humpback whales? Part of the Vava'u archipelago, this island's warm, sheltered waters are often home to humpbacks who swim here to mate and give birth. The island is currently an eco-resort, and has been rated as one of Condé Naste Traveller magazine's Top 100 Islands





KALTSONISI ISLAND, GREECE



Grecian islands very rarely come on the market - so one as charming as this is quite a find. Just off the southern tip of Paxos, the island covers 25 acres and is topped with a small church which dates all the way back to 1686. It's undeveloped, but permission has been granted to build a house there - though bear in mind much of the island is protected forest. Around £4.2 million


Related:  Art Déco London


http://tinyurl.com/nnhx2gf