Fund Your Utopia Without Me.™

06 October 2012

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed! The Way We Should've Fought World War II! - Part VIII










See Also:

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  I 

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  II

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  III

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IV

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  V

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VI

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed! The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VIII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IX

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  X

More to come of Propaganda Poster Series... 

The Truth Is Not Hate Speech, Pussies!




 

I Died So That Big Bird & Co. Could Go On Livin' Large


M2RB:  Frank Sinatra






That's life (that's life), I tell you I can't deny it
I thought of quitting, baby, but my heart just ain't gonna buy it
And if I didn't think it was worth one single try
I'd jump right on a big bird and then I'd fly

I've been a puppet, a pauper, a pirate, a poet, a pawn and a king
I've been up and down and over and out and I know one thing
Each time I find myself layin' flat on my face
I just pick myself up and get back in the race







By Mark Steyn

Apparently, Frank Sinatra served as Mitt Romney’s debate coach. As he put it about halfway through “That’s Life”:

“I’d jump right on a big bird and then I’d fly . . . ”

That’s what Mitt did in Denver. Ten minutes in, he jumped right on Big Bird, and then he took off — and never looked back, while the other fellow, whose name escapes me, never got out of the gate. It takes a certain panache to clobber not just your opponent but also the moderator. Yet that’s what the killer Mormon did when he declared that he wasn’t going to borrow money from China to pay for Jim Lehrer and Big Bird on PBS. It was a terrific alpha-male moment, not just in that it rattled Lehrer, who seemed too preoccupied contemplating a future reading the hog prices on the WZZZ Farm Report to regain his grip on the usual absurd format, but in the sense that it indicated a man entirely at ease with himself — in contrast to wossname, the listless sourpuss staring at his shoes.

Yet, amidst the otherwise total wreckage of their guy’s performance, the Democrats seemed to think that Mitt’s assault on Sesame Street was a misstep from whose tattered and ruined puppet-stuffing some hay is to be made. “WOW!!! No PBS!!! WTF how about cutting congress’s stuff leave big bird alone,” tweeted Whoopi Goldberg. Even the president mocked Romney for “finally getting tough on Big Bird” — not in the debate, of course, where such dazzling twinkle-toed repartee might have helped, but a mere 24 hours later, once the rapid-response team had directed his speechwriters to craft a line, fly it out to a campaign rally, and load it into the prompter, he did deliver it without mishap.

Unlike Mitt, I loathe Sesame Street. It bears primary responsibility for what the Canadian blogger Binky calls the de-monsterization of childhood — the idea that there are no evil monsters out there at the edges of the map, just shaggy creatures who look a little funny and can sometimes be a bit grouchy about it because people prejudge them until they learn to celebrate diversity and help Cranky the Friendly Monster go recycling. That is not unrelated to the infantilization of our society. Marinate three generations of Americans in that pabulum and it’s no surprise you wind up with unprotected diplomats dragged to their deaths from their “safe house” in Benghazi. Or as J. Scott Gration, the president’s special envoy to Sudan, said in 2009, in the most explicit Sesamization of American foreign policy: “We’ve got to think about giving out cookies. Kids, countries — they react to gold stars, smiley faces, handshakes . . . ” The butchers of Darfur aren’t blood-drenched machete-wielding genocidal killers but just Cookie Monsters whom we haven’t given enough cookies. I’m not saying there’s a direct line between Bert & Ernie and Barack & Hillary . . . well, actually I am.

Okay, I may be taking this further than Mitt intended. So let’s go back to his central thrust. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting receives nearly half a billion dollars a year from taxpayers, which it disburses to PBS stations, who in turn disburse it to Big Bird and Jim Lehrer. I don’t know what Big Bird gets, but, according to Senator Jim DeMint, the president of Sesame Workshop, Gary Knell, received in 2008 a salary of $956,513. In that sense, Big Bird and Senator Harry Reid embody the same mystifying phenomenon: They’ve been in “public service” their entire lives and have somehow wound up as multimillionaires.

Mitt’s decision to strap Big Bird to the roof of his station wagon and drive him to Canada has prompted two counterarguments from Democrats: (1) Half a billion dollars is a mere rounding error in the great sucking maw of the federal budget, so why bother? (2) Everybody loves Sesame Street, so Mitt is making a catastrophic strategic error. On the latter point, whether or not everybody loves Sesame Street, everybody has seen it, and every American under 50 has been weaned on it. So far this century it’s sold nigh on a billion bucks’ worth of merchandising sales (that’s popular toys such as the Subsidize-Me-Elmo doll). If Sesame Street is not commercially viable, then nothing is, and we should just cut to the chase and bail out everything.

Conversely, if this supposed “public” broadcasting brand is capable of standing on its own, then so should it. As for the rest of PBS’s output — the eternal replays of the Peter, Paul & Mary reunion concert, twee Brit sitcoms, Lawrence Welk reruns and therapeutic infomercials — whatever their charms, it is difficult to see why the Brokest Nation in History should be borrowing money from the Chinese Politburo to pay for it. A system by which a Communist party official in Beijing enriches British comedy producers by charging it to American taxpayers with interest is not the most obvious economic model. Yet, as Obama would say, the government did build that. 





(Full disclosure: Some years ago, I hosted a lavish BBC special, and, at the meeting intended to sell it to PBS, the executive from Great Performances said he could only sign off on the deal if I were digitally edited out and replaced by Angela Lansbury. Murder, he shrieked. Lest I sound bitter, I should say I am in favor of this as a more general operating principle for public broadcasting: for example, A Prairie Home Companion would be greatly improved by having Garrison Keillor digitally replaced by Paul Ryan.) The small things are not unimportant — and not just because, when “small” is defined as anything under eleven figures, “small” is a big part of the problem. If Americans can’t muster the will to make Big Bird leave the government nest, they certainly will never reform Medicare. Just before the debate in Denver, in the general backstage mêlée, a commentator pointed out Valerie Jarrett, who is officially “assistant to the president for public engagement and intergovernmental affairs,” a vital position which certainly stimulates the luxury-length business-card industry. Not one in 100,000 Americans knows what she looks like, but she declines to take the risk of passing among the rude peasantry without the protection of a Secret Service detail. Leon Panetta, the defense secretary, has a private jet to fly him home from Washington every weekend.

The queen of the Netherlands flies commercial, so does the queen of Denmark. Prince William and his lovely bride, whom at least as many people want to get a piece of as Valerie Jarrett or Leon Panetta, flew to Los Angeles on a Royal Canadian Air Force boneshaker. It is profoundly unrepublican when minor public officials assume that private planes and entourages to hold the masses at bay are a standard perk of office. And it is even more disturbing that tens of millions of Americans are accepting of this. The entitlements are complicated, and will take some years and much negotiation. But, in a Romney administration, rolling back the nickel’n’dime stuff — i.e., the million’n’billion stuff — should start on Day One.

Mitt made much of his bipartisan credentials in Denver. So, in that reach-across-the-aisle spirit, if we cannot abolish entirely frivolous spending, might we not at least attempt some economies of scale? Could Elmo, Grover, Oscar, and Cookie Monster not be redeployed as Intergovernmental Engagement Assistant Jarrett’s security detail? Could Leon Panetta not fly home on Big Bird every weekend?

And for the next debate, instead of a candidate slumped at the lectern like a muppet whose puppeteer has gone out for a smoke, maybe Elmo’s guy could shove his arm up the back of the presidential suit.

— Mark Steyn, a National Review columnist, is the author of After America: Get Ready for Armageddon. © 2012 Mark Steyn





 That's Life - Frank Sinatra

That's life (that's life), that's what all the people say
You're ridin' high in April, shot down in May
But I know I'm gonna change that tune
When I'm back on top, back on top in June


I said that's life (that's life), and as funny as it may seem
Some people get their kicks stompin' on a dream
But I don't let it, let it get me down
'cause this fine old world, it keeps spinnin' around


I've been a puppet, a pauper, a pirate, a poet, a pawn and a king
I've been up and down and over and out and I know one thing
Each time I find myself flat on my face
I pick myself up and get back in the race


That's life (that's life), I tell you I can't deny it
I thought of quitting, baby, but my heart just ain't gonna buy it
And if I didn't think it was worth one single try
I'd jump right on a big bird and then I'd fly


I've been a puppet, a pauper, a pirate, a poet, a pawn and a king
I've been up and down and over and out and I know one thing
Each time I find myself layin' flat on my face
I just pick myself up and get back in the race


That's life (that's life), that's life and I can't deny it
Many times I thought of cuttin' out but my heart won't buy it
But if there's nothin' shakin' come this here July
I'm gonna roll myself up in a big ball a-and die


My, my!




See Also:

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  I 

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  II

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  III

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IV

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  V

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VI

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed! The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VIII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IX

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  X

More to come of Propaganda Poster Series... 

The Truth Is Not Hate Speech, Pussies!



'Toon of the Day: The Empty Chair






Political Cartoons by Michael Ramirez




Let Down: The Undoing of Storybook Man


M2RB: Radiohead






Disappointed people, clinging on to bottles,
And when it comes it's so, so, disappointing.

Let down and hanging around,

Crushed like a bug in the ground.
Let down and hanging around.


Political Cartoons by Jerry Holbert

Obama’s weaknesses are exposed when he encounters a determined opponent.


By Jonah Goldberg

It was the Puss in Boots eyes.

If you’ve seen the Shrek movies or the spin-off cartoon starring the storybook cat voiced by Antonio Banderas, you know what I’m talking about. Whenever Puss in Boots really needs something from someone, he flashes these enormous kitten eyes that melt anyone in their path. Whenever my daughter really wants something, she tries to lay them on me, and I have to say, “Stop trying to give me the Puss in Boots eyes . . . you can’t have chocolate cake for dinner.”

I knew Barack Obama was miserable when he tried to give debate moderator Jim Lehrer the Puss in Boots eyes. “You may want to move on to another topic,” Obama implored Lehrer, a bit like a motorcycle thief begging a cop to take him into custody rather than let him stay with the surly biker gang that caught him.

I expected Romney to beat expectations and win the debate (though I had no clue how decisive his victory would be), not because I thought Romney was such a fantastic debater, but because Obama is the single most overrated politician of my lifetime.

That’s not to say he’s a bad politician.  He’s not.  He’s fine, even pretty good. But he’s not the master so many people claim he is. 

The Irish have a saying: “Hunger makes the best sauce.” And it’s true. If you’re hungry enough, roadkill will make for a king’s feast. Liberals were so hungry for someone like Obama, he seemed like so much more than he really was.

You could hear indications of this fact in the way some of the more crotchety members of the Democratic establishment described Obama.

Senator Harry Reid was blown away by the potential of this “light-skinned” African-American “with no Negro dialect, unless he wanted to have one.”

In 2007, Joe Biden said of his then-opponent, “I mean, you got the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy.” He added: “I mean, that’s a storybook, man.”

Storybook Man, indeed.

While such comments could be described as racially insensitive, they weren’t necessarily racist. They simply reflected the fact that even cynical Democrats understood that the Democratic party — and, to be fair, much of the country generally — craved a mainstream black presidential candidate. Jesse Jackson was too polarizing, some would say too embarrassing, for the job. Obama, meanwhile, was “storybook, man.”

The problem for Obama was that he always believed the most ludicrous version of Storybook Man. He once told a reporter, “You know, I actually believe my own [bovine excrement].”

For a guy who supposedly gives wonderful speeches, he rarely persuades the unpersuaded or inspires those he didn’t already have at “hello.” That’s partly the fault of his speechwriters, who always did him the disservice of producing the kind of pedantic and clichéd boilerplate that Obama mistook for soaring oratory. He thought he smashed through the Democratic primaries like a battering ram through concrete when he mostly pushed on open doors.

As president, he’s convinced himself that he is a policy wonk with a deeper understanding of the machinery of government and the mysteries of the economy than even his advisers. And yet he had to learn on the job that “shovel-ready jobs” were magic beans sold to him by party hacks hungry for pork. He bought a stimulus that only stimulated political cronies. In the debate, he touted windmills and solar power as the energy sources of the future as if he still honestly believed that.

The media’s infatuation with Obama and/or their contempt for his critics only served to reinforce his delusions. When the press laughs at all of your jokes and takes your glib excuses as profound insights, the inevitable result is a kind of flabby narcissism. Kings can be forgiven for thinking they are the greatest poets when the court weeps at their clunky limericks.

The Obama who delivered a shockingly lackluster convention speech last month is the same man who walked into that Denver stadium in 2008 to rapturous approval. The man who lost the debate Wednesday night is the same man who never managed to make Obamacare popular after more than 50 speeches and pronouncements on it in his first year.

The key difference now is that the hunger for Obama has been replaced with the indigestion that follows after four unimpressive years in office. In sales, they say you sell the sizzle, not the steak. In 2008, the man was all sizzle, and the ravenous throng was sold. Now he must sell the steak itself, and it’s full of gristle, fat, and bone. He may yet still close the deal, but only if people fall for his Puss in Boots eyes.

- Jonah Goldberg is the author of the new book The Tyranny of Clichés.  You can write to him at JonahsColumn@aol.com or via Twitter @JonahNRO.  © 2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc...



Let Down - Radiohead

Transport, motorways and tramlines,
Starting and then stopping,
Taking off and landing,
The emptiest of feelings,
Disappointed people, clinging on to bottles,
And when it comes it's so, so, disappointing.

Let down and hanging around,

Crushed like a bug in the ground.
Let down and hanging around.

Shell smashed, juices flowing

Wings twitch, legs are going,
Don't get sentimental, it always ends up drivel.
One day, I am gonna grow wings,
A chemical reaction,
Hysterical and useless
Hysterical and

Let down and hanging around,

Crushed like a bug in the ground.
Let down and hanging around.

Let down,

Let down,
Let down.

You know, you know where you are with,

You know where you are with,
Floor collapsing, falling, bouncing back
And one day, I am gonna grow wings,
A chemical reaction, (You know where you are)
Hysterical and useless (You know where you are)
Hysterical and (You know where you are)

Let down and hanging around,

Crushed like a bug in the ground.
Let down and hanging around.




05 October 2012

Pic of the Day: The Empty Chair Goes Mainstream



121015_2012_p465.jpg




The September Jobs Report: The Big Lie

  




First things first, in February 2009, there were 141.748 million Americans employed in the United States and the labour force participation rate was 65.6%.  In September 2012, 140.025 million Americans were employed and the labour force participation rate had fallen to 63.6%.  Between February 2009 and September 2012, the civilian non-institutional population grew by 8.859 million adults; yet, 1.723 million fewer Americans were working.  In the last year alone, 1.1 million Americans left the work force.

Today's expected -- given the massacre in Denver and next month's election -- "unexpected" drop in the unemployment rate requires a willing suspension of disbelief.  The "spontaneous uprising" in hiring of a whole 114,000 jobs allegedly caused a drop in the U-3 rate of 0.3%.  In August, the US economy added 96,000 and the unemployment rate went from 8.3% to 8.1%.  In July, the US economy added 163,000 jobs and the unemployment rate went up to 8.3% from 8.2% in June when only 80,000 jobs were created.  Go figure.

Somehow...in a economy growing at a miserly 1.3%...873,000 people managed to find jobs.  Of course, 582,000 jobs were part-time jobs, which the Left used to say weren't "real jobs."  The addition of 873,000 jobs, which, according to CNBC, is “the highest one-month jump in 29 years.”  That would have been in November, 1983...when the GDP was 8.5%.  Once again, the annualised GDP rate for Q2 in 2012 was 1.3%.
 
If the labour force participation rate was constant, the U-3 rate would be 10.7%.  

By the way, at a rate of adding 114,000 jobs per month, we wouldn't return to full employment until 2025.   114,000 jobs per month would be great...if we were living in the late 1950s.  We need twice that many just to maintain current employment.  A robustly growing economy requires job creation in the range of 300,000+.  Take a look at the number of jobs that were being created during the Reagan Recovery when GDP was 7-8%.

Finally, and before we turn to the report data, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke just embarked on QE-Infinity because:


 "If the outlook for the labor market does not improve substantially, the committee will continue its purchases of agency mortgage-backed securities, undertake additional asset purchases, and employ its other policy tools as appropriate...We will be looking for the sort of broad-based growth in jobs and economic activity that GENERALLY SIGNAL SUSTAINED IMPROVEMENT IN LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS AND DECLINING UNEMPLOYMENT.  The U.S. unemployment rate has stayed above 8 percent for 43 consecutive months - the longest such period since the Great Depression of the 1930s.  Although the unemployment rate in August fell to 8.1% from July's 8.3%, THE DROP OCCURRED FOR ALL THE WRONG REASONS -- 368,000 FEWER AMERICANS WERE LOOKING FOR WORK AND THE LABOUR PARTICIPATION RATE FELL FROM 63.7% TO 63.5% -- ITS LOWEST LEVEL SINCE SEPTEMBER 1981. If labour participation had remained at July levels, the unemployment rate actually would have risen.  The Federal Reserve is, of course, well aware that THE UNEMPLOYMENT SITUATION IS FAR, FAR WORSE THAN WHAT IS BEING CAPTURED IN THE OFFICIAL HEADLINE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE of 8.1%. THE GOVERNMENT KNOWS FULL WELL THAT THE TRUE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE, ONCE WORKFORCE PARTICIPATION RATE MANIPULATIONS ARE NETTED OUT, IS CLOSER TO 19%."


If the employment picture was truly improving, Ben Bernanke would never have embarked onto the uncharted waters of QE-Infinity.  Well, I shouldn't say the waters are uncharted as the ships of the states of Weimar Germany, Mugabe's Zimbabwe, Yugoslavia, Argentina, and others have been destroyed on the shoals of debt monetisation.

U-6, which counts part-timers, who want full-time work, and the discouraged, is 14.7% and has remained unchanged.  If the underemployed (people working a jobs below their skill-sets) are included, the U-6 hits the high teens or low twenties.  All combined, there are about 23 million Americans unemployed or underemployed.

Among the major worker groups:

Nationally, the U-3 rate for whites was 6.8%, a decrease from 7.2% in August.  The unemployment rate for adult white men dropped to 6.2% from 6.3% in August, for adult white women, it decreased from 6.9% in August to 6.3 % in September, and unemployment amongst white teenagers increased from, 22.0% to 20.8%.

Nationally, the U-3 rate for blacks is 13.5%, a decrease from 14.5% in September. The unemployment rate for adult black men dropped to 13.5% from 13.8% in August, unemployment rate for black women decreased to 11.5% -- down from 13.2% in August, and black teenaged unemployment decreased to 38.1% - down from  38.8% in August.

Nationally, the U-3 rate for Hispanics was 9.4% in September down from 10.1% in August.  The unemployment rate for Hispanic men decreased from 8.1% in August to 7.6% in September, the unemployment rate for Hispanic women decreased to 9.8% (10.3% in August), and the Hispanic teenage unemployment rate finally dropped from its stagnant (and unacceptably high) 29.0% to 27.8% in September.
 
The unemployment rate for Asians 4.8%, an decrease from 5.9% in August. 

In February 2009, there were 2.647 million Americans, who had been unemployed for a period of longer than 27 weeks, and the percentage of the unemployed who were unemployed for a period of more than 27 weeks was 22.4%.

In September 2012, there were 4.844 million Americans, who had been unemployed for a period of longer than 27 weeks, and the percentage of the unemployed who were unemployed for a period of more than 27 weeks was 40.1%. 

In other words, there were 2.197 million more workers suffering long-term unemployment of 27 weeks or more in September 2012, and a 79.018% increase in the percentage of long-term unemployment than when Obama started “working to put the middle class back to work” in February, 2009.


02.09: 2.647 million

09.12: 4.844 million


That’s a 79.018% increase in the number of Americans, who have been unemployed for an average of 27 weeks or more.

BUT, the unemployment rate for government workers went down to 4.3% as a result of 934,000 new hires.

Good news, good news, good news! /s



Who will rid us of this meddlesome priest?




OK, onto the business of the day.....

I ran the numbers comparing January, 2009, to September, 2012.  Also, because of the "unexpected" report this morning, I have left up August's numbers and compared them to September's data.



Civilian non-institution population:  234.739m
Civilian labour force:  153.716m
Employed:  142.099m
Employment-population ratio: 61.3
Unemployed:  11.616m
Not in labour force:  81.023m
Not in the labour force, but who want a job now:  5.62m
Part-time, but want full-time job:  8.038m
Participation Rate:  65.5%
Average Weeks Unemployed:  19.8
Unemployment rate:  7.6%



Civilian non-institutional population:  243.566 m
Civilian labour force:  154.645m
Employed:  142.101m
Employment-population ratio:   58.3
Unemployed:  12.544m
Not in labour force:  88.921m
Not in the labour force, but who want a job now:  6.929m
Part-time, but want full-time job:  10.538m
Participation rate:  63.5%
Average Weeks Unemployed:  39.2
Unemployment rate:  8.1%



Civilian non-institutional population:  243.772 m
Civilian labour force:  155.063m
Employed:  142.974m
Employment-population ratio:   58.7
Unemployed:  12.088m
Not in labour force:  88.710m
Not in the labour force, but who want a job now: 6.427m
Part-time, but want full-time job:  16.708m
Participation rate:  63.6%
Average Weeks Unemployed:  40.1
Unemployment rate:  7.8%


Percentage Change from Jan 2009 to Sept 2012 :

Civilian non-institutional population:  +3.848% increase
Civilian labour force:  +0.876% increase
Employed:  +0.616% increase
Employment-population ratio:  -4.241% decrease
Unemployed:   +4.063% increase
Not in labour force:   +9.487% increase
Not in the labour force, but who want a job now:   +14.359% increase
Part-time, but want full-time job:   +107.863% increase
Participation rate:  -2.901% decrease
Average Weeks Unemployed:  +102.525% increase
Unemployment rate:  +2.632% increase


Percentage Change from Aug 2012 to Sept 2012 :

Civilian non-institutional population:  +0.085% increase
Civilian labour force:  +0.27% increase
Employed:  +0.614% increase
Employment-population ratio:  +0.686% decrease
Unemployed:   -3.635% decrease
Not in labour force:   -0.237% decrease
Not in the labour force, but who want a job now:  -7.245% decrease
Part-time, but want full-time job:   +58.55% increase
Participation rate:  +0.157% increase
Average Weeks Unemployed:  +2.296% increase
Unemployment rate:  -3.704% decrease


I think that this table (Table A-11) is interesting...




582,000 jobs were part-time jobs.


Hey!  Did someone say "War on Women"???  I've got ya a "War on Women."   Check it out:


In January 2009, the number of women employed was:  67.007m

In September 2012, the number of women employed was: 
64.670m

In January 2009, the number of unemployed women was:  4.845m

In September 2012, the number of unemployed women was: 
5.111m

The percentage change in the number of women employed between January 2009 and September 2012 has been a DECREASE of 3.488%.

The percentage change in the number of women unemployed between January 2009 and September 2012 has been an INCREASE of 5.49%.


 "Our growth rate is measly [so what did you expect?]"

- Austan Goolsbee, former Obama economic adviser


Measly growth rate?  Yeah, I guess you could call it that.  **eyeroll**  But, can we at least get it to hurry up so that we can get rid of this imbecile?  Seriously.  Who in their bloody mind would hire and expand with Black Jesus (h/t David Axelrod) as CEO of the country?






The Booby Trap





See Also:

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  I 

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  II

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  III

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IV

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  V

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VI

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed! The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VIII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IX

More to come of Propaganda Poster Series... 

The Truth Is Not Hate Speech, Pussies!



04 October 2012

Pic of the Day: 'Bama's Got A Squeezebox


M2RB:  The Who






'Bama's got a squeezebox
Middle class never sleeps at night
Well the kids don't eat
And the dog can't sleep
There's no escape from the bullscratch
In the whole damn street








"There's no question in my mind if the president is re-elected, you'll continue to see a middle-class squeeze with falling incomes and rising prices."

- Mitt Romney, First Presidential Debate, 3 October 2012











SQUEEZE BOX - The Who

Mama's got a squeezebox
She wears on her chest
And when Daddy comes home
He never gets no rest
'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeezebox
Daddy never sleeps at night
Well the kids don't eat
And the dog can't sleep
There's no escape from the music
In the whole damn street
'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeezebox
Daddy never sleeps at night
She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out 
She's playing all night
And the music's all-tight
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night
She goes, squeeze me, come on and squeeze me
Come on and tease me like you do
I'm so in love with you
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night
She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out 
'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all-right
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night



See Also:

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  I 

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  II

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  III

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IV

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  V

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VI

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed! The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VIII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IX

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  X

More to come of Propaganda Poster Series... 

The Truth Is Not Hate Speech, Pussies!



Biden: You’re darned right Obama and I want to raise a trillion dollars in new taxes





Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed! The Way We Should've Fought World War II! - Part VII










See Also:

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  I 

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  II

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  III

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IV

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  V

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VI

Propaganda Revisited:  We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed! The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  VIII

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  IX

Propaganda Revisited: We Wuz Robbed!  The Way We Should've Fought World War II!  X

More to come of Propaganda Poster Series... 

The Truth Is Not Hate Speech, Pussies!