Fund Your Utopia Without Me.™

08 April 2013

The Iron Lady Has Died. Margaret Thatcher In Her Own Words...






“Socialists cry “Power to the people”, and raise the clenched fist as they say it. We all know what they really mean—power over people, power to the State.”

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, speech to Conservative Central Council, 15 March 1986 


“I came to office with one deliberate intent: to change Britain from a dependent to a self-reliant society — from a give-it-to-me, to a do-it-yourself nation. A get-up-and-go, instead of a sit-back-and-wait-for-it Britain.” 

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, speech to Small Business Bureau Conference, 8 February 1984


“The choice facing the nation is between two totally different ways of life. And what a prize we have to fight for: no less than the chance to banish from our land the dark, divisive clouds of Marxist socialism and bring together men and women from all walks of life who share a belief in freedom.”

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, speech in Perth, Scotland, 13 May 1983

“No one would remember the Good Samaritan if he only had good intentions. He had money as well.” 

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, London Weekend Television Weekend World, 6 January 1980


“Pennies don’t fall from Heaven, they have to be earned here on earth.”

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, Speech at Lord Mayor’s Banquet, 12 November 1979


“Imagine a Labour canvasser talking on the doorstep to those East German families when they settle in, on freedom’s side of the wall. “You want to keep more of the money you earn? I’m afraid that’s very selfish. We shall want to tax that away. You want to own shares in your firm? We can’t have that. The state has to own your firm. You want to choose where to send your children to school? That’s very divisive. You’ll send your child where we tell you.” 

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, speech to Conservative Party Conference, 13 October 1989


“Socialist governments traditionally do make a financial mess. They always run out of other people’s money. It’s quite a characteristic of them.” 

– Margaret Thatcher, Thames TV This Week, 5 February 1976


“If a Tory does not believe that private property is one of the main bulwarks of individual freedom, then he had better become a socialist and have done with it.” 

– Margaret Thatcher, “My Kind of Tory Party,” Daily Telegraph, 30 January 1975

“And I will go on criticising Socialism, and opposing Socialism because it is bad for Britain — and Britain and Socialism is not the same thing. (…) It’s the Labour Government that has brought us record peace-time taxation. They’ve got the usual Socialist disease — they’ve run out of other people’s money.”

– Margaret Thatcher, speech to the Conservative Party Conference, 10 October 1975


“No theory of government was ever given a fairer test or a more prolonged experiment in a democratic country than democratic socialism received in Britain. Yet it was a miserable failure in every respect. Far from reversing the slow relative decline of Britain vis-à-vis its main industrial competitors, it accelerated it. We fell further behind them, until by 1979 we were widely dismissed as ‘the sick man of Europe’…To cure the British disease with socialism was like trying to cure leukaemia with leeches.”

– Baroness Margaret Thatcher, The Downing Street Years, 1993


“They’re casting their problem on society. And, you know, there is no such thing as society. There are individual men and women, and there are families. And no government can do anything except through people, and people must look to themselves first. It’s our duty to look after ourselves and then, also to look after our neighbour. People have got the entitlements too much in mind, without the obligations, because there is no such thing as an entitlement unless someone has first met an obligation.” 

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, interview with Douglas Keay on 23 September 1987, Woman’s Own, published 31 October 1987, pp. 8–10.


“My policies are based not on some economics theory, but on things I and millions like me were brought up with: an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay; live within your means; put by a nest egg for a rainy day; pay your bills on time; support the police.” 

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, The News of the World, 20 September 1981

“Economics are the method; the object is to change the heart and soul.”

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, interview for The Sunday Times, 1 May 1981


“I think, in a way, the fact that we went through that winter was a rather shattering experience for many many people and particularly the trade unions. Because the whole of public opinion was massively against them and I think they’ll think twice before they go through that again. Those particularly in the part of the public sector dealing with the social services. Yes we do have to get across to them that every penny we provide to the public sector, the non-marketing public sector, has to be earned for us by the marketing sector, whether it’s public or private. All of those in the public sector, who are not in the business side of the public sector, depend upon the success of business enterprise. And what is in danger of happening is that so much seems to be going into public sector pay, that the private sector is being drained of resources that it needs. That’s another reason why we simply have to stick and say I’m sorry there’s only so much money, there isn’t any more. And we just do have to stand and say no. But equally, I think we have a duty to explain. Some people then say to me, ah, you’ve got a pay policy. Of course I have. My pay policy is for the public sector to live within what the nation earns. It was called good housekeeping and living within your means long before it was called a pay policy. There really is no alternative.” 

– Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, Press Conference for American correspondents in London, 25 June 1980



"The role of Ronald Reagan had been deliberately diminished; the role of the Europeans, who, with the exception of Helmet Kohl, were often keen to undermine America when it mattered, had been sanitized; and the role of Mr. Gorbachev, who had failed spectacularly in his declared objective of saving communism and the Soviet Union, had been absurdly misunderstood."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"(Gorbachev's) remarks in Prague seemed to me, to say the least, of doubtful validity. Yet nor should they be lightly dismissed. They represent the articulation of a strategy, common to the left in many countries, of seeking to escape all blame for communism and then going on to take credit for being more pragmatic, modern, and insightful about the world which those who actually fought communism have created. It is a pressing necessity to expose and defeat both distortions." 

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"As the former dissident Vladimir Bukovsky one remarked -- referring to the Russian proverb to the effect that you cannot make an omlette without breaking eggs -- he had seen plenty of broken eggs, but had never tasted any omlette." 

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft


"If...many influential people have failed to understand , or have just forgotten, what were up against in the Cold War and how we overcame it, they are not going to be capable of securing, let alone enlarging, the gains that liberty has made."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"I too have a certain idea of America. Moreover, I would not feel entitled to say that of any other country, except my own. This is not just sentiment, though I always feel ten years younger - despite the jet-lag - when I set foot on American soil: there is something so positive, generous, and open about the people - and everything actually works. I also feel, though, that I have in a sense a share of America." 

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"It is important not to allow ever wider coalition-building to become an end in itself. As we saw in the Gulf War of 1990, international pressures, particularly those exerted from within an alliance, can result in the failure to follow actions through and so leave future problems unresolved." 

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"The West as a whole in the early 1990s become obsessed with a 'peace dividend' that would be spent over and over again on any number of soft-hearted and sometimes soft-headed causes. Politicians forget that the only real peace dividend is peace." 

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"...The defence budget is one of the very few elements of public expenditure that can truly be described as essential. This point was well-made by a robust Labour Defence Minister, Denis (Now Lord) Healey, many years ago: 'Once we have cut expenditure to the extent where our security is imperilled, we have no houses, we have no hospitals, we have no schools. We have a heap of cinders.'

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"Women have plenty of roles in which they can serve with distinction: some of us even run countries. But generally we are better at wielding the handbag than the bayonet."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"When we hear (as we sometimes do) that (Russia's) economic output is about half the level of a decade ago or that real incomes have fallen sharply, it is worth recalling that economic statistics under the Soviet Union were hardly more reliable than any other official statements. Moreover, a country that produces what no one wants to buy, and whose workers receive wages that they cannot use to buy goods they want, is hardly in the best of economic health."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"It is always important in matters of high politics to know what you do not know. Those who think that they know, but are mistaken, and act upon their mistakes, are the most dangerous people to have in charge."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"The application of collective guilt, running from one generation to another, is a dangerous doctrine which would leave few modern nations unscathed."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"When in August 1793 a British delegation showed their hosts a terrestrial globe, it turned into a diplomatic incident, for the Chinese were furious to see that their empire covered so little of it. For centuries the Chinese had thought of themselves as 'The Middle Kingdom', that is the centre of the civilized world. To see otherwise was a shock."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"It can be argued - and rightly - that Taiwan is not just another regional issue: after all, the Chinese regard it as part of China. But Taiwan is also a regional issue for three reasons. First, the overthrow or even the neutering of democracy in Taiwan, which is what Beijing effectively demands, would be a major setback for democracy in the region as a whole. Second, if the Chinese were able to get their way by force in Taiwan, they would undoubtedly be tempted to do the same in other disputes. And third, there is no lack of such disputes to provoke a quarrel."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"Rogue states never turn out to be quite the pariahs they are deemed. They are only able to cause, or at least threaten to cause, mayhem because they enjoy the covert support - usually by means of technology transfers - of one or more major powers within the charmed circle of global 'good guys'."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"As a motive for terror, religion has more often than not required a good deal of lubrication by lucre."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"It is recorded how towards the end of the eighteenth century a Muslim visitor to England was taken to see the House of Commons at work. He later wrote of his astonishment at finding the that the British Parliament actually made laws and fixed punishments for their infraction - because unlike Muslims the English had not accepted a divine law revealed from heaven and therefore had to resort to such unsatisfactory expedients. Muslims still understand the expression 'the rule of law' very differently than do most Westerners." 

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"The Iraqis had paid a terrible price for Saddam's folly (in the Gulf War). But looking at the devastation they left behind (in Kuwait), my sympathy was limited."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"President Numeiri of Sudan is said to have remarked of Gadaffi that he was 'a man with a split personality - both of them evil'. 

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"(Not) even the US can impose peace: it has to be genuinely accepted by both parties involved."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"Israel must never be expected to jeopardize her security: if she was ever foolish enough to do so, and then suffered for it, the backlash against both honest brokers and Palestinians would be immense - 'land for peace' must also bring peace."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"...Conservatives have excellent credentials to speak about human rights. By our efforts, and with precious little help from self-styled liberals, we were largely responsible for securing liberty for a substantial share of the world's population and defending it for most of the rest."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"The Nuremburg trials were attacked at the time as 'victor's justice'. And this is precisely what they were - and were intended to be."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"For the victors of the Cold War to submit to an unelected, unaccountable, and almost certainly hostile body such as that envisaged would be the ultimate irony." 

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"Major international interventions are doomed unless the US is directly or indirectly involved. But if American politicians, officials and servicemen are to be put at risk of arrest and prosecution, the United States will be most reluctant to act in order to curb aggression or prevent genocide. So the effect of the court may well be to diminish, not increase, the numbers of (in the words of the UN Secretary General) 'innocents of distant wars and conflicts'."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"It is in a country's interests to keep faith with its allies. States in this sense are like people. If you have a reputation for exacting favors and not returning them, the favours dry up."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"Left-wing zealots have often been prepared to ride roughshod over due process and basic considerations of fairness when they think they can get away with it. For them the ends always seems to justify the means. That is precisely how their predecessors came to create the gulag."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"Whether it is in the United States or in mainland Europe, written constitutions have one great weakness. That is that they contain the potential to have judges take decisions which should properly be made by Democratically elected politicians."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft

 
"Whether at home or abroad, the task of statesman is to work with human nature warts and all, and to draw on instincts and even prejudices that can be turned to good purpose. It is never to try to recreate Mankind in a new image."

- Margaret Thatcher, Statecraft